BonnieBlueFlag

Saturday, December 31, 2005

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

From: BonnieBlueFlag

A special bubbly New Year's toast to my "auld acquaintances," who will never be forgotten, and to my new friends and neighbors on the Internet. Each of you holds a special place in my heart, and in my thoughts, and I wish you all the very best in 2006.


"We'll take a cup o' kindness yet, for auld lang syne."


"Auld Lang Syne" was originally an ancient Scottish Folk Ballad, that may have been first noted in about the 1550s, but is perhaps even older. It had been sung for generations, however, it had only been handed down in the oral history and traditions of Scotland. Wherever Scotsmen traveled, particularly to England and America, the ballad followed.

In about 1788 the Poet of Scotland, Robert Burns, took a version of the song, polished it, added a verse or two, and wrote it down on paper for what is thought to have been the first time.

The Traditional Scottish Version

"Auld Lang Syne"
by Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days o' auld lang syne.

Chorus:
And for auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint-stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

Chorus:

We twa hae run about the braes
And pu'd the gowans fine;
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot
Sin auld lang syne.

Chorus:

We twa hae paidl'd i' the burn,
Frae mornin' sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin auld lang syne.

Chorus:

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right guid willy waught,
For auld lang syne.

Chorus:
And for auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.



A Translation from the Scots:

auld; old
lang; long
syne; since
Auld Lang Syne; days of long ago
jo; sweetheart, dear
be: paid for
braes; hills
burn; stream
pint stowp; pint tankard
pou'd; pulled
twa; two
hae; have
gowans; daisies
mony; many
fitt; foot
paidl'd; waded
dine; dinner-time
braid; broad
fiere; friend
willie-waught; draught


A Standard English Version

"Old Long Past"
or "Times Gone By"

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And days of old long past.

Chorus:
And for old long past, my dear,
For old long past,
We will take a cup of kindness yet,
For old long past.

And surely you will pay for your pint-tankard!
And surely I will pay for mine!
And we will take a cup of kindness yet,
For old long past.

Chorus:

We two have run about the hillsides
And pulled the wild daisies fine;
But we have wandered many a weary foot
Since old long past.

Chorus:

We two have paddled in the stream,
From morning sun till noon;
But seas between us broad have roared
Since old long past.

Chorus:

And there is a hand, my trusty friend!
And give me a hand of yours!
And we will take a right good-will drink,
For old long past.

Chorus:
And for old long past, my dear,
For old long past,
We will take a cup of kindness yet,
For old long past.

8 Comments:

  • A special toast to you that all good things come to you in 2006!

    Happy New Year!
    Connie

    By Blogger Connie and Rob, at December 31, 2005 8:17 PM  

  • Here's a toast to you, BonnieBlueFlag, for all the interesting posts of last year, and for all the ones to follow in this new year. Thanks for the lyrics; I particularly liked this verse: We twa hae paidl'd i' the burn,
    Frae mornin' sun till dine;
    But seas between us braid hae roar'd
    Sin auld lang syne.
    The meaning is very sweet and nostalgic, and I imagine the sounds are equally beautiful when spoken by a true Scotsman.

    By Anonymous Pindar, at January 01, 2006 11:12 PM  

  • Bonnie Blue,
    One doesn't often sing the Scottish words here in the D. C. area. My grandmother and her sister used to sing them, though; they preserved those words in the hills of East Tennessee. Also, thank you for posting Burns's words and for providing the background information.

    I'm late, but...Happy New Year!

    By Blogger Always On Watch, at January 02, 2006 5:15 AM  

  • I never knew the words to that song-nor did I know the translation. The song was more poignant and beautiful than I realized. Thanks!

    And a very happy new year to you, Bonnie!

    By Blogger Timothy Birdnow, at January 02, 2006 8:06 AM  

  • Good morning dear fieres,

    I was surprised and touched too, when I discovered the real meaning of the words to the song. In the future I will have an entirely different frame of mind, whenever I hear the words being sung.

    Like Pindar, the fourth verse painted a lovely picture for me too.

    While the fifth verse gave me more of an understanding of the friendship that is described in the song, and how it came to be our New Year's Eve Ballad.

    AOW, I detect the possibility of a fellow Scots-Irishman.

    My own kinfolk came down the Shenandoah Valley through North Carolina, east Tennessee and on to west Tennessee.

    I have long thought that the dialects spoken in the Cumberland Mountains even today, were more akin to Old English than most people realize.

    By Blogger BonnieBlueFlag, at January 02, 2006 9:25 AM  

  • wow! i had no idea that's what they were saying! thanks for the lesson!

    :)

    By Anonymous nikki, at January 02, 2006 10:08 PM  

  • Even though I'm a bit late to the party, I have to say how much I loved this post. The words are just so beautiful, and I second Pindar's comments on the beauty of the original Scottish. No wonder the song makes us so nostalgic. Thanks so much for the beautiful piece of history. And Happy New Year, Bonnie!!

    By Blogger Aussiegirl, at January 03, 2006 7:07 PM  

  • Aussiegirl, it is the 3rd of January, did your New Year's Eve party just end?

    By Blogger BonnieBlueFlag, at January 03, 2006 7:37 PM  

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